Month: October 2019

Birth Plan Examples

Examples of birth plans from real parents, including unmedicated natural birth, sexual assault survivor, and scheduled c-sectionBasic crunchy birth plan: Have baby.

BOOM. Done. Right?

Is it inherently a little crunchy to have a birth plan at all? You don't need need one, but many parents-to-be find the process of creating a plan incredibly helpful to discuss options and preferences for labor and delivery of their baby.

Some general birth plan tips:

  • Keep it to one page. It's more likely to be read.
  • Take it to your prenatal appointment so your desires can be put on file in case your practitioner cannot attend your birth.
  • Consider a visual plan if that resonates with you.

What Makes It a Crunchy Birth Plan?

In my experience, some elements you may be considering that add to the crunchy factor could be:

  • having a birth doula (and you should!)
  • preferring an unmedicated birth if possible
  • wanting to move around freely during labor
  • not wanting to give birth laying on your back
  • requesting dim lighting and your own music
  • using essential oils during labor
  • declining cervical checks
  • declining prophylactic pitocin after birth
  • declining antibiotic eye ointment for baby

If you're not sure about these, I have a few of my favorite books for pregnancy and childbirth for you.

Birth Plan Examples from Real Moms I Know

It's helpful to see all your options, but here are some sample birth plans from friends of mine to give you an idea of what one might look like "in the wild."

CLICK HERE to read a birth plan aimed at an unmedicated vaginal birth*. It includes contingencies for Cesarean birth or if the baby is sick, too.

* I don't use the term "natural birth" because all birth is natural.

CLICK HERE to read a birth plan for a sexual abuse survivor. This is a great example of why a birth plan can be so important and empowering.

CLICK HERE for a birth plan for a scheduled Cesarean birth. Her baby was breech, but a belly birth doesn't mean you can't have a say in your experience.

Earth Mama Angel Baby also has a free birth plan checklist.

Or maybe Jeff and Jamie's birth plan is more your style. Sense of humor required. 😉

My oldest was born in the hospital and we did have a birth plan. My second birth at home was more along the lines of "have baby." You can read about my birth story here!

How to Prevent Choking During Baby-Led Weaning

In my years of teaching classes on introducing solids with baby-led weaning I always go around the room and ask everyone to introduce themselves and to share what their biggest concern they’re hoping to learn about. Number one worry, far and away, is a fear of choking.

It just seems scary to give a tiny baby actual pieces of food, doesn’t it? Possibly even dangerous! So why choose baby-led weaning to start if they could choke?

How to Avoid Choking During Baby Led Weaning


As I cover in my class, there are a few parts to this concern.

First is the difference between gagging and choking. Gagging is a natural reflex that actually prevents choking because babies are designed to survive even first-time parents. Choking is the obstruction of the airway by (in this case) a piece of food. Gagging is scary, but not dangerous; choking is to be avoided if possible.

If you haven’t taken an infant CPR class, you may feel better taking one now. You can also do a little YouTube self-study which is better than nothing. I cover this more in my introducing solids course, but choking is silent while gagging is not. My mantra is, “If they’re coughing, they’re breathing.”

Is There an Increased Risk of Choking with Baby-Led Weaning?

A 2016 study in New Zealand followed over 200 babies as they started solids and found that 35% of the babies in the whole study had a choking incident during the period they observed. The percentage was across groups who started with purees or finger foods, because the issue was that a high percentage of the babies were offered foods that were choking hazards.

The best ways to prevent choking during baby-led weaning are:

  • wait until baby is physically ready to start solids, and
  • offer foods that are developmentally appropriate for your child

Babies can’t read calendars, so it’s important to watch their motor development to ensure they’re able to eat food and maintain their posture to prevent choking during baby-led weaning.

Signs of readiness include: baby can sit well without support, baby has lost their tongue thrust reflex, baby is bringing items to their mouth, baby is starting to develop a pincer grasp, and baby is eager to participate in meals.

As I mentioned, not feeding your baby choking hazards significantly reduces the risks! In the study I mentioned above, over a third of the choking incidents reported were due to raw apples. Learn from those parents’ mistakes!

Choking hazards during baby-led weaning include: raw apples, raw vegetables, unripe/hard fruit, citrus segments, whole nuts, popcorn, whole grapes, cherry tomatoes, hot dogs/sausages, food cut into coins, hard crackers/chips, hard/chewy candy

For more in-depth information, my Introducing Solids class covers the when, why, and how of starting foods with your baby, including breastfeeding and allergens.

Hundreds of parents have felt more confident and informed while approaching solid foods with their babies. You can, too!